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CITIES & PLACES OF INTEREST

  

 

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

Thailand

Below, the niches on the inside of the main chedi of Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (fig.) display Buddha images in different poses, the one on the left seated in the lotus position with his hands in a vitarka mudra (fig.).

 

The other images here below, all belong to the Phra prajam wan system (fig.), the one here on the right being known as Pahng nahg prok (fig.) and corresponding to Saturday.

See also POSTAGE STAMP.

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

The next Buddha image is standing in the pahng tawaai naet pose, i.e. with the arms crossed in front of the waist, and which corresponds to Sunday (fig.).

 

This standing Buddha image represents Monday in the Phra prajam wan geut system, known in Thai as the pahng hahm yaht pose, with the right hand raised, i.e. gesture known as an abhaya mudra (fig.).

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

A reclining Buddha image, a pose known in Thai as pahng saiyaat, and which in the Buddha per day system correspondents to all those born on a Tuesday (fig.).

 

One of two Buddha images used for people born on a Wednesday. This one is for the daytime and is known as paang um  baat (fig.). The other one is used for pwoplw born after sunset and is called pahng pah leh laai (fig.).

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)

 

This Buddha image is seated in the pahng samahti pose, i.e. in meditation, with the legs crossed in the half lotus position (fig.), with the hands resting on his lap. It corresponds to people born on a Thursday (fig.) and is similar to the dhyani mudra.

 

This last image in the Phra prajam wan geut system, is known in Thai as the pahng ram peung pose and it represents all those born on a Friday (fig.).

See also POSTAGE STAMP and QUADCOPTER PICTURE.

 

  Wat Prayun Wongsahwaht (inner chedi)